Heart Treatment

Dr. Sonny Wong is the best in the field of cardiology, taking care of his patients personally and with the greatest attention to them as individuals and their particular concerns. Dr. Wong is the leading teaching professor at the University of Hawaii, instructing first and fourth-year medical students in the art of heart care techniques. You can rest assured that you are getting optimal care at Windward Heart.

Cardiac Risk Assessment

To assess your risk of heart disease we conduct a cardiac risk assessment. The risk questionnaire accounts for blood pressure, testing of your triglycerides, and total cholesterol levels (LDL and HDL). The results of this test are reviewed by Dr. Wong thoroughly before treatment.


Myocardial Perfusion Imaging

This test is performed similarly to a normal EKG stress test. In a Nuclear Myocardial Perfusion Stress Test, pictures of heart circulation are taken using an isotope that is injected through an IV, to track the circulation of the substance. An exercise stress test follows and another dose of the isotope is injected. A few minutes of exercise is performed to allow circulation of the isotope into the heart, where post-exercise pictures are taken again. These photos are used in a side-by-side comparison to measure circulation.

Stress Echocardiogram

Commonly referred to as an echo, an echocardiogram is an ultrasound testing of the heart and all its components. Sound waves show the shape, texture, and movement of heart valves, the size of the heart chambers and how well they work. This test also allows the doctor to analyze the direction and speed of blood flow through the heart. Here we can determine improper opening and closing (stenosis or regurgitation) of heart valves to properly assess valve disease. This test is painless and takes approximately half an hour.

How is the echo performed?

During an echo, electrodes are placed on the patient’s chest monitoring the heartbeat. The technician will move a gel-coated device firmly over your chest. This device sends sound waves to the heart that bounce back to a machine and are then transformed into images on a video monitor. The patient may be asked to breathe according to the technician’s directions, as having air in the lungs can affect the quality of images.

If a doppler study is being performed, a test that measures the direction and speed of blood flow, you may hear a whooshing sound during the test. The images are recorded so that the doctor can review them after the test.

After the test, the patient can return to their normal daily routine. The doctor will review the images produced during the echocardiogram and will discuss the results in a follow-up appointment.

Holter and Event Monitors

Holter and Event Monitors are devices that record the heartbeat during normal daily activities. They are used to detect abnormal heart rhythms, evaluate symptoms such as chest pain, dizziness, or fainting, and to monitor the progress of current treatments. Monitors are connected to your body via electrodes. These electrodes, which are also connected to the monitoring device, are put on the chest to record the heartbeat.

How long does each monitor require?

A Holter Monitor records a heartbeat for 24 – 48 hours. An Event Monitor only records your heartbeat when activated by the patient pressing a button, or when they have a qualifying event. This device is worn for a longer period than a Holter Monitor, ranging from two weeks to over one month.

Vascular Ultrasound

Ultrasound is used to image various arteries and veins in the body. In the neck, we explore the carotid arteries to diagnose and catch potential blockages, that can lead to stroke. The leg arteries can be scanned for blockages. Blockages in these areas are referred to as Peripheral Artery Disease (PAD). Ultrasound of the leg veins helps diagnose the cause of varicose and spider veins, or deep vein thrombosis (DVT). Scanning the aorta that travels through the stomach, can screen the body for any signs of an aortic aneurysm, or weakness in the walls of the artery. Any rupturing of this artery can lead to sudden death.

EKG

An EKG monitors the electrical activity of your heartbeat. This activity is measured by attaching electrodes to the chest that are directly connected to an EKG machine. The results of the EKG are then reviewed by the nurse.

EECP Therapy

Enhanced External Counter Pulsation, or EECP therapy, is a safe, non-invasive, outpatient treatment option for individuals suffering from ischemic heart diseases such as angina, coronary artery disease and heart failure. This therapeutic medical device returns blood back to the heart during the relaxation phase of the heartbeat, giving patients all the benefits of having a second heart pumping for them. EECP increases the blood flow to heart blood vessels and throughout the body’s organs, resulting in numerous health benefits overall.

Echocardiogram

An Echocardiogram, or “echo,” is an ultrasound test for the heart. It uses sound waves to show the shape, texture, movement of the heart valves, the size of the heart chambers and how well they function. The opening and closing of heart valves (stenosis and regurgitation) are assessed to make sure the heart is promoting blood flow at full capacity. This test allows the doctor to analyze the direction and speed of blood flow through the heart. This test is painless and takes approximately half an hour.

During an echo, electrodes are placed on the chest; these monitor the patient’s heartbeat. The technician will move a gel-coated device firmly over your chest. This device sends sound waves to the heart that bounce back to a machine and are translated into images on a monitor. The patient may be asked to breathe according to the technician’s directions as having air in the lungs may affect the quality of the images. If a Doppler Study is being performed, a test that measures the direction and speed of blood flow, you may hear a whooshing sound during the test. The images are recorded so that the doctor can review them after the test.

After the test, the patient can return to their normal daily routine. The doctor will review the images produced during the echo and will discuss the results in a follow-up appointment.

EKG Stress Test

An EKG stress test often referred to as an exercise test, is a cardiac stress test that allows the doctor to determine how well your heart performs under stress. The EKG stress test takes about 30 minutes, however, there are many variations from the standard test and can take anywhere up to three hours.

If you are having a standard EKG stress test, you will be required to walk on a treadmill. The intensity level of exercise is easy at first and gradually increases; the treadmill either tilts to mimic movement uphill and/or speeds up.If a patient cannot exercise the test can be performed with the administration of medications that “stress” the heart without exercise. This is useful for patients who cannot walk because of joint problems, have had prior strokes, or are too weak to exercise.

It is important to exercise for as long as possible in order to get the best results from the EKG stress test. Throughout the test, your heartbeat, blood pressure, breathing, and level of fatigue are monitored. A stress test helps the doctor understand the strength of your heart and can show whether there is a lack of circulation. Results will indicate what types of exercise and activity levels are right for you, and if further testing is needed.
Dr. Wong is the best in the field and we welcome new patients all the time. Get the care you deserve with Windward Vein, Heart and Medispa.
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Windward Vein, Heart, Medispa